HEARING LOSS STATISTICS

Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans and there currently no FDA approved therapies for hearing loss.  Hearing aids and cochlear implants are the only options for those with disabling hearing loss.

I. GLOBAL HEARING LOSS

Worldwide* – Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans.  According to new 2012 estimates on the magnitude of disabling hearing loss released by the World Health Organization (WHO), there are 360 million persons living with disabling hearing loss.*

  • 360,000,000 total

  • 328,000,000 adults

  • 32,000,000 children

*Adults: loss greater than 40dB in good ear.
Children: loss greater than 30dB in good ear.

DISABLING HEARING LOSS IS MOST PREVALENT IN LOW INCOME COUNTRIES

89% of persons with DHL reside in low income countries:

Adults 291,000,000
Children 31,100,000
Total 322,100,000

LOW INCOME COUNTRIES INCLUDE:

  • Central/Eastern Europe

  • Central Asia

  • Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Middle East and North Africa

  • South Asia, Asia Pacific, East Asia

  • Latin America and Caribbean

II. USA HEARING LOSS

USA(1) – According to 2014 US population projections, persons living with hearing loss;

  • 36,000,000 adults (18+)

  • 12,000 children born with hearing loss

SOCIETAL COSTS OF SEVERE TO PROFOUND HEARING LOSS IN USA(2)

  • $297,000 over the lifetime of an individual. Most of these losses (67%) are due to reduced work productivity

  • $1,000,000+ over the lifetime of a child with prelingual onset hearing loss

  • $4.6 billion will be spent over the lifetime of persons who acquired their impairment in 1998.

III. GENETICALLY INDUCED HEARING LOSS – INITIAL FOCUS FOR RHI

Role of Genetics(3) – More than 50% of prelingual deafness is genetic.  In the general population, the prevalence of hearing loss increases with age. This change reflects the impact of genetics and environment, and also interactions between environmental triggers and an individual’s genetic predisposition.

(*) WHO global estimates on prevalence of hearing loss; Mortality and Burden of Diseases and Prevention of Blindness and Deafness WHO 2012. http://www.who.int/pbd/deafness/estimates/en/

(1) See Below:
– Fortnum HM, Summerfield AQ, Marshall DH, Davis AC, Bamford JM. Prevalence of permanent childhood hearing impairment in the United Kingdom and implications for universal neonatal hearing screening: questionnaire based ascertainment study. BMJ. 2001;323:536–540. doi: 10.1136/bmj.323.7312.536.
– National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) – 3 / 1000 births
– 245,000,000: Colby, Sandra L. and Jennifer M. Ortman, Projections of the Size and Composition of the U.S. Population: 2014 to 2060, Current Population Reports, P25-1143, U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC, 2014.
– 36,000,000- 15% of adults 18+ had some trouble hearing- Blackwell DL, Lucas JW, Clarke TC. Summary health statistics for U.S. adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2012. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 10(260). 2014. (PDF)
– 50 to 60 percent of newborns w/ hearing loss due to genetic causes: Hearing Loss in Children- Genetics of Hearing Loss: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilties.
– 4,000,000- CDC/National Center for Health Statistics: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/births.htm
– CDC Hearing Loss Homepage, Data and Statistics – http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/hearingloss/data.html

(2) Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 2000 Autumn;16(4):1120-35. The societal costs of severe to profound hearing loss in the United States.  Mohr PE1, et al.

(3) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Genetics of Hearing Loss. https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/hearingloss/genetics.html